Intel Says Chip-Security Fixes Leave PCs No More Than 10% Slower

Intel Says Chip-Security Fixes Leave PCs No More Than 10% Slower

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Intel, trying to defuse concern that fixes to widespread chip security vulnerabilities will slow computers, released test results showing that personal computers won’t be affected much and promised more information on servers, according to Bloomberg.

The chipmaker published a table of data showing that older processors handled typical tasks 10 percent slower at most, after being updated with security patches. The information covered three generations of processors, going back to 2015, running Microsoft’s Windows 10 and Windows 7 operating systems.

“We previously said that we expected our performance impact should not be significant for average computer users, and the data we are sharing today support that expectation on these platforms. As of today, we still have not received any information that these exploits have been used to obtain customer data,” Navin Shenoy, an Intel senior vice president who heads its data center unit, said in a statement. “We plan to share initial data on some of our server platforms in the next few days.”

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